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Archive for January, 2011

Mystery writer Lorraine Bartlett wears a number of pseudonymous caps. Writing under her own name, she is the author of the new series, Victorian Square Mysteries, whose first installment, A Crafty Killing, debuts this February. Writing as Lorna Barrett, she pens the Booktown Mysteries series, and as L.L. Bartlett, she writes the Jeff Resnick Mysteries. An Agatha-nominated, New York Times bestselling author, Bartlett is a busy woman. (more…)

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Elly Griffiths is the author of a series of crime novels set in England’s Norfolk county and featuring forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway. The first in the series, Crossing Places, earned a good deal of praise both in Griffiths’ native country, England, and in the U.S. The Literary Review termed it “a cleverly plotted and extremely interesting first novel, highly recommended.” Kirkus Reviews also lauded the work, noting, “A winning debut…. the first-rate characters and chilling story are entrancing from start to finish.” (more…)

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Manchester-based writer Chris Simms is the author of six novels in the D.I. Jon Spicer series, procedurals which follow the investigations of the mercurial Spicer. Simms’s most recent installment in the series, Cut Adrift, earned him a place on the short list for the 2010 CWA Dagger Award and elicited rave reviews from the critics. The Guardian called it “well-researched, pacey and engaging,” while the Irish Independent dubbed it “an absolutely ace British police procedural.” (more…)

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Henry Chang’s Chinatown series featuring Chinese-American NYPD Detective Jack Yu debuted to critical acclaim in 2008 with Chinatown Beat, “a fascinating look at New York’s Chinese-American urban community and its subcultures,” according to Publishers Weekly. The Boston Globe also had praise for this first novel, noting, “For readers who relish noir suspense, it doesn’t get any better than this stunning novel.”

Chang followed up that success with Year of the Dog, “a dense, moody, and intelligent glimpse at Chinese life in New York as seen through the world-weary eyes of a young man with a foot firmly planted in two cultures,” as Booklist commented. His 2010 series addition, Red Jade, was termed a “fast-moving police procedural with added sociological depth,” by Booklist. Chang’s third novel also earned a coveted starred review from Library Journal, whose critic observed, “An action-packed plot and a carefully detailed mystery make this a feast for readers who crave insight into the cultural melting pot that is the United States.” (more…)

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